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Sunday, December 11, 2005

Peers

From Diane Greco’s fascinating December 8 post in her blog:
The assumption that children of the same age constitute a true peer group only holds true for children of average development. The term peer does not, in essence, mean people of the same age, but rather refers to individuals who can interact at an equal level around issues of common interest.

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